A lesson worth remembering

I copied this article from my Facebook feed.  I wrote it shortly after a lone gunman took aim at the police in Dallas on July 7th who were protecting a peaceful BLM protest.  The BLM folks were upset at two killings of black men over the course of two days, at the hands of the police.  I copied it here to keep it. With all the cries of racism and fear mongering this week, I’m reminded of a lesson my father taught me. Now, for those of you who don’t know, my father was Dr. Anand Malik. He was a college professor who emigrated to the US from India. He had lived through the partition of India, which is a level of secular violence that no one in the USA has ever seen and few can comprehend. We used to sit around on Sunday mornings flipping through the newspapers. Plural. Newspapers. We got the Knoxville newspaper, of course, but he also subscribed to the New York Times Sunday Edition. He loved the NYT but we couldn’t afford the daily edition. But every Sunday, we’d go through and the house would quickly be scattered with sections from art to lifestyle to editorial to hard news. One Sunday, there was an article on the refugee camps in the Palestinian territories. He mumbled something and I asked him what was wrong. “A hundred thousand people stuck in those camps, it’s senseless. In India, during partition, there were MILLIONS of people displaced. No camps. Everyone had to simply find a place to go, and go there. Today, there are no camps.” I said...